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Introduction: How Title IV-A Funding Works
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Introduction: How Title IV-A Funding Works

NH Title IV-A Student Support and Academic Enrichment Grant Program

This section of the toolkit will introduce you to the NH Title IV-A Student Support and Academic Enrichment program and help districts better understand the purpose of funding under Title IV-A of the Every Student Succeeds Act.

Distribution of Funds

Each state will receive an allocation from the flexible block grant based on the Title I funding formula. Using the same Title I formula, states will then allocate funds to school districts. Any school district that receives a formula allocation above $30,000 must conduct a needs assessment and must then spend 20 percent of its grant on safe and healthy school activities and 20 percent on activities to provide a well-rounded education programs. The remaining 60 percent of the money can be spent on all three priorities, including technology. However, there is a 15 percent cap on spending for devices, equipment, software and digital content.

If a district receives an allocation below $30,000, the law does not require a needs assessment or setting aside percentages for well-rounded and safe and healthy students programs. However, the district must spend money on activities in at least one of the three categories. The 15 percent technology purchase cap would continue to apply. ESSA authorizes Title IV-A funds to be distributed by formula with the requirement that every district receives an allocation of at least $10,000. Districts can invest their dollars in programs that fall under three buckets: health and safety programs, well-rounded academic programs and educational technology.

Program Funding Need

Evidence shows students need access to health and safety programs, a diversity of academic programs and modern technology.

  • Evidence supports a direct correlation between physical and mental health and learning that is essential to academic success, school completion, and the development of healthy, resilient and productive citizens. Schools are uniquely positioned to help students acquire lifelong knowledge and skills through comprehensive health education, physical education, nutrition, comprehensive school mental and behavioral health services, counseling, and integration among all education and health programs.
  • In order to succeed, students need access to a well-rounded curriculum. Block grant funds will help schools expand music, art, STEM, computer science, accelerated learning, history and civics courses, as well as expand access to college and career guidance and counseling.
  • Federal investments in education technology ensure schools have technology-proficient educators, well-equipped classrooms, sufficiently supported administrative structures and a curriculum optimized to take advantage of the benefits technology offers to all students. These benefits include closing the opportunity and learning gaps and providing students with essential modern workforce skills.

Given the elimination of numerous programs under ESSA that support the overall health and safety of students, the investments in education technology, as well as helping districts ensure access to a well-rounded education, a robust federal investment in support of these programs is absolutely essential through Title IV Part A. Without a significant investment in Title IV Part A, districts will be forced to choose which of the priorities to invest in– even though an ample investment in all three is necessary to provide students with a comprehensive education.

Districts receiving $30,000 or more are required to:
  • Perform a comprehensive needs assessment in order to justify their activities as a determined need.
  • Spend at least 20% of their funds on well-rounded academic programs.
  • Spend at least 20% on safety and healthy students programs.
  • Spend at least some of the remaining available on effective use of technology.
  • Spend no more than 15% of their effective use of technology funds on infrastructure technology.
For more information, visit: Title IV-A Coalition
Title IV-A Program page on the NH Department of Education website.


Resource and Reading Links

Title IV-a Coalition https://www.titleiva.org/what-is-title-iv-a/

New Hampshire ESSA Consolidated State Plan https://www.education.nh.gov/essa/documents/nh_state_plan_final_011918.pdf

Title IV-A Program at the NH Department of Education https://www.education.nh.gov/instruction/integrated/title_iv_a.htm

Student Support and Academic Enrichment Grants Non-Regulatory Guidance https://www2.ed.gov/policy/elsec/leg/essa/essassaegrantguid10212016.pdf

Last updated April 25, 2019

The Titile IV-A Project Planning Toolkit is supported by New Hampshire EdTech at the New Hampshire Department of Education.