An

 

Induction-with-Mentoring

 

Toolkit

 

 

 

A School District’s Guide to

Initiating and Developing

Induction-with-Mentoring Services

 for New Teachers

 

This Toolkit is available electronically at the following:

http://nheon.org/prof_dev/mentoring/index.php

Acknowledgements

This Toolkit is the result of a truly collaborative and voluntary effort of a variety of stakeholders working toward a common vision of supporting new educators in New Hampshire.  Its development would not have been possible without the dedication, knowledge, expertise, time, energy, and enthusiasm that so many educators willingly shared with us in this effort.  Their commitment is heartwarming and their passion is contagious. 

 

We would like to thank all who have helped with this project, but especially the following:

·        Members of The New Hampshire State Board of Education, for their support and guidance throughout this project.

·        Members of The Mentoring Task Force, for their courage and willingness to tackle the daunting task of developing a beginning draft of an ambitious document in a very short time period.

·        Members of the Best Schools Mentoring Team, for their tireless effort and commitment to finishing a sometimes tedious and thankless job of developing a set of resources to be used by school districts.

·        Reviewers, for their invaluable and candid feedback on numerous drafts of the Toolkit.

·        Mentoring Support Group, for their encouragement, honesty, and input grounded in reality.

·        Our facilitator, for keeping us focused, on task, motivated, and well fed.

 

This is a work-in-progress, and we will continue to update it as more resources become available and as we gain feedback from districts on its usefulness.  

 

 


Mentoring Task Force

 

Members:

Chris Demers, Mentoring Coordinator, Concord School District

Judy Handley, Professional Development Coordinator, Concord School District*

William Haust, Plymouth State College

Douglas Heuser, Director, SEE Science Center and Northern New England Co-Mentoring Network

Elaine Holt, Assistant Superintendent, Nashua School District

Penny Kittle, Mentoring Program Director, Kennett Sr. High School

Mary Lane, Education Consultant, Bureau of Special Education, NHDOE

Jessica (Sam) Levesque, Instructional Specialist, Hudson Memorial Middle School*

Ross Lurgio, Assistant Superintendent, Bedford School District

Nancy McCall, Teacher, Merrimack Valley*

Pam Miller, Director of Curriculum for Humanities, Goffstown High School*

Jane Morrill-Winter, Instructor, New England College

Grace Jeffrey Nelson, Public Ed. & School Support, NH-NEA

Carolyn Oleson, PSB Member and Teacher, Exeter High School

Susan Paige-Morgan, Service Learning Coordinator, NH Dept. of Education*

Gail Paine, State Board of Education

Mike Reardon, PSB and Headmaster, Pembroke Academy

Patricia Severance, Mentor, Merrimack Valley School District*

Doug Sutherland, Assistant Superintendent, SAU 35

Kathleen Totten, Director, Eastern Region Partnership

Diane Vienneau, Peer Coach, Nashua School District*

Debbie Woelflein, Instructional Supervisor, Merrimack School District*

 


Coordinators:

Susan Gifford, Task Force Coordinator, Education Consultant, NH Dept. of Education*

Tondy Higginbotham, Task Force Director, Administrator, NH Dept. of Education*

 

Facilitator:

Deborah S. Roody, Educational Consultant*

 

July, 2007 Revision Contributors:

Laureen Cervone, Rich Chretien, Lisa DiMartino, Louise Forseze, Susan Gifford, Jonathan Higgins, Lori Langois, Richard Latham, Melissa Lewis, Juan Lopez, Chris Nelson, Sheri Parker, Irv Richardson, Deborah S. Roody, Wendy Siebrands, Steve Stanley, Bev Straneva, Terri Towle

 

* Indicates member of Best Schools Mentoring Team

 

Reviewers:

Joyce Choate, Curriculum Supervisor, Litchfield School District

Maryann Conners-Kirkorian, Principal, West Running Brook Middle School, Laura Dailey, Paraeducator Program Coordinator, College for Lifelong Learning

Joan Gagnon, Former SpEd Teacher, Stratham

Elisabeth Gustavson, Teacher Mentor, Danville Elementary School

Emily Hartnett, Mentor, Contoocook Valley School District

Anne Marie Jones, Director of Teacher Education, Plymouth State University

Jane Morrill-Winter, New England College

Marcia McCaffrey, Education Consultant, NH Dept. of Education

Marsha Miller, Regional Director & Tech Prep Coordinator, NH IT Pathways & Future Educators Academy

Maxine Mosley, Guidance Counselor, Manchester School District

Michele Munson, Assistant Superintendent, SAU 21, Hampton

Debra Nitschke-Shaw, Director of Teacher Education, New England College

Jim Nourse, Executive Director, Upper Valley Teacher Institute

George Reid, NH-AFT

Terry Tibbetts, Education Consultant, NH Dept. of Education

Kathleen Totten, Director, Eastern Region Partnership

Susan Villani, Senior Program/Research Associate, Learning Innovations at WestEd

Cheri White, Education Consultant, NH Dept. of Education

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Acknowledgements.................................................................................... 2

Mentoring Task Force............................................................................... 3

Are You Ready?  Thinking about getting started.............................. 4

How to Use This Toolkit.......................................................................... 11

Section I.  Program Standards and Indicators of Practice with Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment........................................ 1

1.  SUPPORTS FOR THE BEGINNING EDUCATOR....................................................................................... 4

2.  SUPPORTS FOR MENTORS........................................................................................................................... 30

3.  ROLE AND SUPPORTS FOR ADMINISTRATORS.................................................................................... 46

4.  PROGRAM SUPPORT..................................................................................................................................... 54

5.  PROGRAM EVALUATION.............................................................................................................................. 78

6.  RELATIONSHIP TO TEACHER SUPERVISION AND EVALUATION AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT..................................................................................................................................................... 81

7.  SYSTEMIC PROGRAM.................................................................................................................................... 88

Section II.  TOOLS FOR PROGRAM IMPROVEMENT...................................... 1

A.  PROGRAM ASSESSMENT AND PLANNING............................................................................................... 2

B. ASSESSING PROGRAM IMPACT ON RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION OF NEW TEACHERS 8

C. ASSESSING PROGRAM IMPACT ON PARTICIPANTS........................................................................... 15

D.   ASSESSING PROGRAM IMPACT ON STUDENTS.................................................................................. 22

E.  ASSESSING PROGRAM IMPACT ON THE SCHOOL OR DISTRICT AS A SYSTEM...................... 25

Section III:      Making the Case.................................................................. 1

A.   FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT INDUCTION-WITH-MENTORING . . . WITH ANSWERS FROM THE RESEARCH.................................................................................................................... 5

B.   SUMMARY OF KEY RESEARCH................................................................................................................ 16

Section IV:      Resources............................................................................ 1

A.  WHAT’S HAPPENING IN NEW HAMPSHIRE............................................................................................. 3

B.   PRINT RESOURCES....................................................................................................................................... 10

C.  ELECTRONIC RESOURCES.......................................................................................................................... 37

GLOSSARY - HELPFUL TERMS FOR INDUCTION-WITH-MENTORING TOOLKIT........................................................................................................................ 45

Sources Cited........................................................................................... 533


 Preface

 

USERS:  This IWM Toolkit is designed to be used by the following stakeholders:

 


¨     IMW Program Directors

¨     Superintendents

¨     Principals

¨     Assistant Principals

¨     Head Masters

¨     Curriculum & Instructors/Directors

¨     School Board Members

¨     Mentors/Peer Coaches

¨     Professional Development Providers

¨     IWM Teams

¨     Mentees

¨     Human Resources Directors


 

The induction of educators starts with an information-rich hiring process that matches the knowledge and skills of the educator with the responsibilities of the position.  Once hired, the new educator engages in an on-going induction process, the ultimate purpose of which is to promote student learning.   Purposeful and effective district and school induction activities include, among other things:

 

·       Orientation to the district and school as well as ongoing induction to the expectations for specific job responsibilities, to the resources available to fulfill those responsibilities, and to the contexts in which job responsibilities are to be completed;

 

·       Mentoring from an experienced educator who is skilled in mentoring beginning educators. The purpose of mentoring is to enhance student learning through ongoing induction and coaching in the instructional practices of new teachers; and,

 

·       On-going professional development as a member of a professional learning community to increase professional skills and to ensure full participation in the professional learning communities of the school and district.

 

This document represents the efforts of the Mentoring Task Force and Mentoring Best Schools Team to identify and describe the stages of development in a beginning educator induction-with-mentoring program that intends to improve student achievement by:

 

·        Providing beginning educators with the support needed to effectively transition into the profession;

·        Fostering professional growth over time for all beginning educators; and

·        Attracting and retaining high quality teachers.

 

Induction-with-mentoring services are contributors to improved student achievement when the components described here are an integral part the school culture and organization.  We base this work on the research that cites teacher quality as the key ingredient to improved student achievement.  Induction-with-mentoring services are intended to support beginning educators to reach a higher level of skill and expertise faster and more efficiently than if they start their careers with no such supports.  Successful teachers are satisfied teachers and, therefore, ones who wish to stay in the profession and in school districts that support teachers with strong learning communities.  Ideally, support services would be provided to all educators (not just teachers) who are new to the profession, district, building, or grade level and be provided to educators during the first three years in which they are transitioning into the profession.  In addition, it is recommended that such services be coordinated at the district level.  However, we realize that districts just beginning a program may have to work toward these goals.  Furthermore, because most research and resources focus on teacher induction and mentoring, this Toolkit’s primary focus is on teachers.

 

In this document, the components needed for an effective induction-with-mentoring program are presented in chart form.  The components are useful as a self-assessment tool to assist in determining the current level of implementation.  They may also be used as a tool to initiate a program, making certain that essential functions are in place from the start. 

 

This Toolkit grew out of a New Hampshire Symposium on Attracting and Retaining Quality Educators, initiated in October 2000.  The Symposium identified several priorities to be addressed by the State Board of Education.  One of these priorities was to investigate and make recommendations regarding mentoring for beginning educators.  Accordingly, the State Board authorized the New Hampshire Department of Education to create a Mentoring Task Force, whose charge was two-fold:

 

1) Develop recommendations to the State Board on how the State could best support the development of induction-with-mentoring services in New Hampshire schools; and

 

2) Develop standards and guidelines for induction-with-mentoring. 

 

The Task Force worked for six months and presented its recommendations and a beginning draft of the Toolkit to a group of reviewers and finally to the State Board in August 2002.  The Toolkit was reviewed and updated during the spring of 2007.

 


Are You Ready?  Thinking about getting started

 

There are some important questions to explore and answer before you decide to embark on implementing an induction-with-mentoring program, as well as a number of elements that should be in place to build for success.

 

GET READY …

 

Why are we even thinking about induction-with-mentoring?  Are we clear on what we hope it will change or accomplish for us as a school, district, or community?

 

GET SET

 

Do we have the right resources in place, or identified?  Do we have the support of the school board and larger community?  Do we have a champion? 

 

AND GO

 

Have you paused and taken stock of the ‘pre-requisites’ and feel like you are ready to move forward?  If yes – your next steps should be to pick up the IWM Toolkit and begin the process of a needs/self-assessment to create a prioritized action plan for moving forward!

 

 

 

 

 

 

GET READY …

 

Why are we even thinking about induction-with-mentoring?  Are we clear on what we hope it will change or accomplish for us as a school, district, or community?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.2       ASK: Is there anything in place already?

 

What does it look like?

What results are we getting and how do we know?

What supports are in place?

How does what’s in place meet /or not meet the goal/purpose?

What is the change needed?

 

1.3       ASK:   Who or what is driving this discussion/ decision?

Þ     Perceived need

Þ     DINI/SINI

Þ     Overwhelming number of new teachers . . . .

Þ     Grant money available

Þ     Some evaluation results

Þ     Program development

 

 What are the implications of these drivers over others?

 

 
 

 

 

 

 



Back-Up to Step 1 – Getting Ready

 

Explanation:

There is often a terrific urge to dive into the nuts and bolts planning of an induction-with-mentoring program in order to feel a sense of accomplishment.  Resist this urge!  Spend time talking about the purpose of the program and what success will look like.  Involve as many stakeholders in this discussion as possible.  The results of this discussion (even if you modify them over time) will be the basis of your communication message, your program design, your budget, and your evaluation plan.  We can’t overemphasize the importance of making this your first step.  Document the results of your discussion on the following worksheet.

 

What to do:

 

1. CONVENE a representative sample of your school community.  This group may be your Design Team or a larger gathering from which your Design Team will be formed.  Group size makes a difference in your discussion – the larger the group, the longer the discussion will take, and the more likely you will consider all points of view.  At this stage, it is worth taking the extra time.

 

2.  CONDUCT a discussion of the questions posed in Step 1.  Ask a person whose point of view is represented by someone else in the group to facilitate this discussion so that the facilitator can concentrate on keeping the discussion going and making sure all voices are heard.

 

3.  RECORD your results!  Record publicly in the meeting, in minutes of the meeting, and in your program documentation.

 

References: There is much written about induction and mentoring.  Most sources that describe programs or approaches speak to the possible benefits.  Some key resources on this topic are available in Sections III and IV of the Induction-With-Mentoring Toolkit. 

 

Where does the Toolkit talk about Goal Setting?

Section I          Standard 7, Systemic Program

Section III        Making the Case – for information that helps support the need for IWM programs and discusses the types of impact they have

Section IV        Resources – organized by subject, with annotations to help guide your selection of reference materials

 

What other resources might help?  The New Hampshire Department of Education, in partnership with your local education support center.

 

 

Advice from the Experienced:

 

Induction-with-mentoring programs can yield enormous results for all faculty members, not just new teachers, but they cost money.  Without clear objectives, and ways to know that you have achieved those objectives (evaluation data), funders will not be inclined to prioritize the induction-with mentoring program over other desired programs.  Make sure that you have clearly defined goals from the start; decide what evidence you will need to show you have reached those goals; and make sure these goals are endorsed by those who will be making funding decisions.

 

A Scenario:

 

Pineland School District, while forecasting future needs, realized that 45% of the teacher workforce would be retiring within 6 years.  The superintendent and school board decided they needed an induction-with-mentoring program to attract and retain new, quality, teachers.  The superintendent asked a middle school principal to assemble a group of teachers from the district that would research mentor programs and suggest a program design to meet the need.  The teachers, once assembled, reviewed the literature and immediately requested additional administrators be added to the team along with a curriculum coordinator and a professional development team member.  After discussion they agreed that retention was a vital goal, but that they wanted more – they wanted a program that would support new teachers building their instructional expertise.  Their rationale was that new teachers who saw their students succeed beyond expectation in the first year of their teaching would be most willing to stay on the job.  Thus, they could accomplish both purposes with one program.

 

Last Word:

 

Did we impress upon you the importance of defining a goal and deciding what success looks like as a first step in your process?

 

 

 

 

 

GET SET

 

 Do we have the right resources in place, or identified?  Do we have the support of the school board and larger community?  Do we have a champion? 

2.2       DECIDE WHO WILL BE SERVED AND HOW LONG

 

v     Novice teachers (just out of teacher training)

v     Alternative Certification teachers

v     New to the district

v     New to the building

v     New to the grade level

v     New to the content area

v     Administrators

v     Paraprofessionals

v     Other

 

2.1       START COMMUNICATING – BUILD SUPPORT

 

Administration

Teachers

School Board

Community

 

 

2.3       START BUILDING A STRUCTURE

 

v     Full time mentor or teacher mentor model?

v     What’s required and what’s not?

v     Which buildings/grade levels?

v     Induction and Mentoring

o       How do we define them?  What belongs to which?

o       Who does what – when and how

o       Which comes first?

v     Identify Program Services

o       Mentoring

o       Induction

v     Identify/Outline Procedures

o       Mentor Criteria, recruitment and identification

o       Mentee identification and prioritization

o       Matching procedures

o       Conflict resolution

v     Identify Program Supports

o       Mentor/Mentee expectations (role description)

o       Administrator expectations (role description)

o       Time – time to meet, coverage to meet

o       Assignment considerations

o       Incentives

o       Documentation – what and how used

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 


Year 1

 

 

 

2.4       DEVELOP A PROGRAM EVALUATION PLAN

How will we know?

 

v     Given the goals . . .

o       What will be our success measures?  (Think broadly and realize this will be a phased in process.)

v     Gather baseline data

v     Gather/develop tools

v     Define a reporting process

o       What information

o       To Whom It May Concern

o       When

 

 

2.5       THINK SYSTEMICALLY

v     How does what we are planning relate to:

o       Supervision and evaluation

o       Professional development

o       Confidentiality

o       Other services/processes in the district

o       Union

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Back-Up to Step 2 – Start Planning

 

Explanation:  The first steps are often the hardest, and you are likely to feel overwhelmed by the amount of information that needs to be uncovered and organized.  Appoint one member of the design team as the facilitator and charge that person with keeping things on track.  Take small bites, and give yourself the time you need to work through all this information.  Continue to fight the urge to dive in!  Your planning time will ensure you build a strong foundation that will serve you well in the future.

 

What to do: 

 

1.     CONVENE your design team, and create a time and place for monthly meetings.  Start with the Program Assessment and Prioritization Tool (Section II – Tool A.1) and begin working your way through a self-assessment.  This tool covers a lot of ground, so be patient and take each section slowly.  You will need time to gather information and data between meetings.  Once completed, you will have a solid understanding of what elements of your program might already exist and where your strengths exist.

 

2.     COMMUNICATE as a way of building support.  Talk to your colleagues informally, but also arrange time for formal presentations to faculty, the school board, families, local businesses – any group that you think could support this work.  Remember that school boards and district administrators have MANY things that compete for their attention, so you need to find a way to make your message stand out and be heard.  You might draw parallels with other fields (for example, would you want a doctor without any real experience to treat you?).  Understanding the local context is critical, and drawing on local data is more meaningful than using state or national statistics.  One of the most effective communication strategies is to make a direct connection between induction and student learning.

 

3.     CONSULT with others.  Get some assistance from someone who is experienced and understands the process – you may not make as many mistakes!  You should get in touch with your local education support center or the New Hampshire Department of Education for guidance, resources, and partnership opportunities.

 

Resources: Powerpoints and agendas for presentations on why IWM is important are available from your local education support center, or directly from the New Hampshire Department of Education.

 

Advice from the Experienced: Many school districts need a full year of planning to be ready for implementation.  The first year of planning is important for the SAU team to understand what was driving their decision to implement an IWM program.  How much time is needed for planning is a direct reflection of the culture of that organization and anywhere from three months to one year is needed.  At a minimum, there needs to be time to develop a team of individuals who support the IWM program and are invested in planning, implementation and sustaining it.  The mentor training given once the program is planned also gives further momentum for projects as they go from planning to implementation and are the boost needed to gain new investors in the process (like new teachers and mid-career mentor teachers).  Says Deb Roody, Educational Consultant and IWM Toolkit Facilitator “Mentoring often comes easy, induction is harder – the idea of supports for new teachers across all they need to know, from the urgent to the important.”

 

A scenario:

 

Initiating School District 

 

This School District is a rural school administrative unit (SAU) made up of several small districts, typical in Western and Northern New Hampshire, has spent the last year planning for the implementation of an Induction-With-Mentoring program.  While there were many conversations about induction and mentoring and sporadic attempts in different districts, there was no unifying program for the SAU.  Several teachers at the high school level, where there were some elements in place, brought together a team under the superintendent’s leadership. 

 

The team of fifteen made of SAU staff and representatives from each school district went through a yearlong planning process, guided by a facilitator trained in using the Induction-with-Mentoring Toolkit.  They engaged in introductory meetings to explain the process and the program model and then learned how to use the IWM Toolkit as a guide. Through these meetings, they realized they wanted to get beyond a buddy system and create a program that improved instruction and student achievement.  The group took stock of what was in place and who was driving decisions through the use of a summary and prioritization table.    That tool gave the group an opportunity to document their current program, and their new mission and vision and define an “ideal program” for their SAU.

 

Last Word:  Did we impress upon you the importance of creating LOTS of time for planning and data gathering?

 


 

AND GO

 

Have you paused and taken stock of the ‘pre-requisites’ and feel like you are ready to move forward?  If yes – your next steps should be to pick up the IWM Toolkit and begin the process of a needs/self-assessment to create a prioritized action plan for moving forward!

 

 

 

IMPLEMENTATION REQUIREMENTS:

 

Implementation requirements are factors that should be in place before a school or district embarks on planning and implementing an induction-with-mentoring program.  The notion is that without these prerequisites, implementation cannot be successful.

 

INITIAL REQUIREMENTS:

 

Initial requirements are those without which an induction-with-mentoring program cannot be successful and should, therefore, not be attempted:

 

  1. A vision or set of desired outcomes for the program of services

Without a vision or articulated purpose, the program will devolve into a series of  “buddy” relationships that may be supportive of new teachers, but yield little other benefit.  The potential for an induction-with-mentoring program to be powerful professional development for the classroom practice of novice, and experienced, teachers is documented; however, this benefit does not happen automatically.  It must be envisioned, planned for, and supported.

 

 

  1. Authority to establish or operate a program.

While the impetus for an induction-with-mentoring program may come from the top or from the grass roots, it cannot survive in any organized form without an authority to operate granted by the administration.  Ideally there is substantive support and leadership from building and district administrators.

 

  1. A “Champion”

Any new induction-with-mentoring program needs a champion to envision what the program will look like, how it will work, and what benefits will be realized.  The champion can come from the administration or the ranks, but needs the time and support to “make things happen.”  In practice, a program planning team (or design team ???) team is recommended, because even if there is a champion, he/she will informally consult others consistently.

 

  1. Resources

There are costs involved to establishing and maintaining an induction-with-mentoring program such as incentives, training, sub coverage, materials, meeting costs, etc.  There needs to be a commitment to providing these resources for the long term, even though initial program support may come from a grant or temporary source.

 

  1. Training for Mentors

There are discrete skills that effective mentors use to help new teachers with their thinking and practice.  Mentors should be provided with on-going training from a skilled trainer.  Training should include orientation to the responsibilities and expectations of being a mentor and a program should have some accountability measures.  Without this, there is no program, only a group of well meaning people doing their best to help new staff; in short, a buddy program.

 

  1. Knowledge source

Build a program on research and best practice.  A great deal of research, knowledge, and effective practices are available in the literature to guide and assist districts in establishing or improving induction-with-mentoring programs.  This knowledge can be easily accessed, and should be, when program components are defined and planned.  Frequently, reference to research or practice described in the literature helps justify funding, as does local data. 

 

 

 

 

 

ON-GOING REQUIREMENTS:

 

On-going requirements are those which contribute substantially to the success of a program and which greatly ease the implementation process.

 

  1. Learning focused culture

School districts that are working toward a culture characterized by learning for all community members will find the benefits of the induction-with-mentoring program multiplied exponentially.  New staff assimilate and learn quickly when the whole organization feels responsible for their learning.  For many school districts, an induction-with-mentoring program contributes to the building of a learning-focused culture when one does not exist.

 

  1. A design team

While a “champion” can help establish and lead a program, a representative team of people who raise and address issues of program development create a stronger, more lasting result.  More heads are better than one.

 

  1. Strong district focus and support for professional development

An induction-with-mentoring program is an act of professional development.  When embedded in a context of professional development for all staff, at all levels, the program integrates more quickly into “the way things are done here” and doesn’t remain a “nice, but not necessary” add-on.

 

  1. Standards for effective teaching

The intention of mentoring is to directly address classroom practice. Therefore, a program should clearly define or adopt a standard of effective professional practice. If there is no accepted definition of what effective practice looks like, then mentoring activities provide support and help problem solve, but don’t  necessarily achieve effective practice, as intended.

 

 

  1. Teachers involved who exemplify effective teaching

Learning happens by modeling and doing, as well as study and dialog.  Without strong models for good teaching, the program suffers.  Having strong models means a district not only articulates and shares its values and standards for teaching but also identifies teachers who exemplify those standards.  Novices can model poor standards as well as good ones; make sure those teachers you showcase exemplify what you wish to promote.  Great classroom teachers do not by definition make the best mentors, but they can still model practice and be a resource to new teachers.

 

  1. Involvement of administrators

Ultimately no program will succeed without strong support from administrators.  However, it is the case that a program may start with administrator sanction and support, but without much involvement.  Over time administrators must learn and practice their own roles in making the program a success.

 

  1. Leadership – Formal and/or informal leaders

There needs to be people (i.e. design team) who take responsibility for researching and sharing ideas, acting on decisions, modeling practices, monitoring and gathering data, and problem solving.  It takes a whole community to “raise” a new teacher.

 

  1. Planning for sustainability

It is not unusual for an induction-with-mentoring program to be initiated as a pilot program, with grant monies or some source of financial support other than the district budget.  However, program leaders (such as champions, design team or administrator??) need to have the resolve from the beginning to start planning for sustainability.  If the intention is that the program will die away after initial funds are gone, it is questionable whether the program should be started at all.  Induction-with-mentoring programs do not run themselves after the initial stages. 

 

  1. Data collection and program evaluation.

Program planning, designing, and evaluation of impact require data collection be an integral part of the program.  Moreover, anything beyond an informal buddy program will require resources and, most likely, some evidence to prove that the resources spent are “worth it”.  Planning for “knowing you got the results you paid for” starts from the beginning and requires evaluation be an integral part of the planning process.

How to Use This Toolkit

 

The materials presented in this Toolkit are not intended to be an implementable program, rather a list of the necessary components needed for an effective Induction-with-Mentoring program. 

 

PURPOSES:  The IWM Toolkit is designed for the following purposes:

                                                                                                                                    

¨     Assess your current program or services.

¨     Determine collectively where your program is strong and weak, and the subsequent, strategic steps to be taken to develop your program.

¨     To provide resources that will help in the areas where development is needed.

¨     To develop a short and long term plan for program development.

¨     Identify who will be responsible for implementing and maintaining the program.

¨     Collect and analyze data.

¨     Provide ongoing opportunities for evaluation.

 

 

 

Our suggestions for how to use this Toolkit are these:

                                                                                                                                    

1.              Assess your current program or services using the Program Standards and Indicators of Progress

 

 

With an interested group of administrators and teachers, review each component and element of the chart and decide which description best matches your situation.  Guiding questions for self-assessment are included following each standard, along with the suggestion to record the evidence you have on hand.

 

For each element or component ask yourselves, “What is the evidence that makes me, or us, choose this description?”  Be as explicit as possible as this will help later in the process.

 

There is no scoring to achieve in this process.  There is no value to being in one place or another on the chart.  It is about objectively looking at your program and the parts needing development.  The “win” comes when your district has all components in place and is realizing the goals of an induction program: easing new teachers into the profession, building a firm foundation of classroom teaching skills, supporting the kind of experience that keeps teachers in your district, and, of course, enhancing the performance of students.

 

2.              Discuss the evidence identified for each component.  Determine collectively where your program is strong and weak, and the subsequent, strategic steps to be taken to develop your program

 

If your district has any induction/mentoring activity, it is likely that your program matches descriptions all over the chart.  Based on the evidence on which there is agreement in your group, decide which areas can be left in place for the moment, which areas need immediate attention to support, or better support, those services in place, and which components should be longer term development goals.  For example, if your district has mentor services alone, we would advise your paying immediate attention to the induction aspects of your program.  If you have elements of these two components in place, carefully examine the supports available – release time, incentives, coverage for observations, for example.  It could be that training in mentoring skills will become a next priority.   Longer term goals may focus on the systemic components and building a culture of learning and support within the district.         

 

When your group is not in agreement about the evidence and what it indicates, spend some time exploring peoples’ different points of view.  It may be that services are stronger in one building than in another, which raises questions about development of services in one building versus all buildings in the district.

 

3.              Look for resources that will help in the areas needing development

 

This toolkit offers you a variety of resources related to various aspects of program initiation and development.  We have tried to categorize these resources to expedite use.  You may also find it useful to consult with someone experienced in using these materials – the state department of education or your local education support center would be good places to start. 

 

 

 

4.              Develop a short and long term plan for program development

 

More than likely, your district can’t do everything at once.  Think of your program as a multi-year development process and plan accordingly.  Set clearly articulated goals and articulate ways to measure those goals.  Your system is making the progress for which it has planned.  No doubt sponsors of your program – administration, school boards, grant sources – will want to know what progress has been made.

 

5.              Identify who will be responsible for shepherding the program in its continued development

 

Developing induction-with-mentoring services won’t just happen.  An individual or group of individuals must be assigned responsibility for it and be willing to see it through.  Because this is a long term endeavor, expectations should be to support the individual or group over time.

Text Box: 	
	USERS:  This IWM Toolkit is designed to be used by the following stakeholders:
	
•	IMW Program Directors
•	Superintendents 
•	Principals
•	Assistant Principals
•	Head Masters
•	Curriculum & Instructors/Directors
•	School Board Members
•	Mentors/Peer Coaches
•	Professional Development Providers
•	IWM Teams
•	Mentees
•	HR Directors

6.              Implement your plan

 

Nothing will happen if nothing happens!  (There’s a bit of wisdom.)  Write a plan that won’t just sit on the shelf but that is written with implementation in mind.  Make sure responsibilities and authorities are clear and that there are incentives for follow through.

 

Work the network.  We have included information in this toolkit about other districts in the state that are working to achieve the same results and are solving the same problems as your district. Get in touch.

 

Find resources that have current ideas as well as people willing to engage with your system about the work.  Associations like ASCD (Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) and NSDC (National Staff Development Council) sponsor induction and mentoring networks of interested educators all over the USA and world.  Look for further ideas on costs and funding.  When your system begins to achieve the results promised by robust induction with mentoring services, your district should be planning program support within its annual budget.

 

7.              Evaluate your results

 

Did your district achieve progress? Without evaluating your progress, it will be difficult to report to supporters that their interest and investments have been worth it.  Identify your target goals and evaluation strategies at the beginning of the process, decide what evidence is needed and plan ways to gather it.  Then do it, and carefully analyze your data.  Learn from your successes and failures to adjust or improve your program.  This Toolkit is designed to help your district in this process.

 

8.              Assess your program using the Toolkit periodically

 

Over time develop more specific descriptions for how certain functions look in your district.  The toolkit is meant to be generic to apply as broadly as possible.  Check your program once a year against the descriptions here as a way to help keep your “eyes on the prize” of an established program that achieves all the intended results.

 


Section I.  Program Standards and Indicators of Practice with Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

 

 

 


Section I.   Program Standards and Indicators of Practice with Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Program Standards:

 

1.     Support for the Beginning Educator

2.     Support for Mentors

3.     Role & Supports for Administrators

4.     Program Support

5.     Program Evaluation

6.     Relationship to Teacher Supervision & Evaluation and Professional Development

7.     Systemic Program

 

The levels of implementation described in this document are cumulative and map the growth of a program over time. 

 

¨    Initiating - These are initial requirements without which IWM services cannot be successful and should, therefore, not be attempted.  Most elements relate to implementation and therefore do not have an initiating description.  Please note that not all standards or indicators of progress have an initiating requirement.

¨    Beginning - The Beginning Level describes a program in its initial years.  The Beginning Level represents a program foundation.  Many components already need to be in place before a program would even be considered to be at a Beginning Level.

¨    Developing - The Developing Level describes a program that is taking root, with evidence and documentation.  The program should reflect changes made as a result of learnings from the Beginning Level.

¨    Establishing - The Establishing Level represents a formalized induction-with-mentoring program that is integral to the culture of the school district.


Program Standards and Indicators of Practice


 

1.     SUPPORT FOR THE BEGINNING EDUCATOR

a.     Organizational Supports for Beginning Educators

b.     Orientation for Beginning Educators

c.     Ongoing Induction for Beginning Educators

d.     Mentor/Mentee Focus

e.     Mentor/Mentee Strategies

i.      On-going observation and Modeling

ii.     Reflection and Metacognition

iii.   Mentor Use of Resources for the Benefit of the Mentee

f.      Developing Goals and Professional Portfolios

g.     Specialized Training for Alternative IV and V Certification Candidates and/or Highly Qualified Teacher Candidates

2.     SUPPORT FOR MENTORS

a.     Orientation for Mentors

b.     Regularly Scheduled Mentor Support Meetings

c.     Training topics for Mentors

d.     Compensation for Mentoring

e.     Scheduling Supports to Perform Mentoring Responsibilities

f.      Recognition and Celebration

3.     ROLE AND SUPPORTS FOR ADMINISTRATORS

a.     Program Monitoring

b.     Administrator Training

c.     Collaboration Around Administering the Program

4.     PROGRAM SUPPORT

a.     Leadership, Authority, Vision and Desired Outcomes

b.     Documentation:  District Policies and Procedures Manual and Induction-with-Mentoring Program Handbook

c.     Criteria and Process for Selecting Mentors

d.     Criteria and Process for Matching Mentor and Mentee

e.     Time for Mentor/Mentee to Meet

f.      Supportive Atmosphere

g.     Collaborative Culture/Learning Community

h.     Contact Lists and Community Resources

i.      Stress and Wellness Issues

j.      Grievance Process

k.     Integrated Support System

5.    PROGRAM EVALUATION

a.     Program Evaluation

6.     RELATIONSHIP TO TEACHER SUPERVISION AND EVALUATION AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

a.     Nonjudgmental Confidentiality

b.     Relationship to Teacher Supervision and Evaluation Defined

c.     Relationship to Professional Development

7.     SYSTEMIC PROGRAM

a.     Research Base, Data Collection for Strategic Decision-Making

b.     Alignment to District Philosophy and Beliefs

c.     Commitment of All Stakeholders

d.     District-wide Coordination

e.     Educator Roles Served

f.      Relationship to Lifelong Professional Growth and Student Performance



 

PROGRAM STANDARDS AND INDICATORS OF PRACTICE

 

1.  SUPPORTS FOR THE BEGINNING EDUCATOR

 

1.A. Organizational supports for beginning educators

1.B. Orientation for beginning educators

1.C. Ongoing induction for beginning educators

1.D. Mentor/Mentee Focus

1.E. Mentor/Mentee Strategies

        1.E.1. Ongoing observation and modeling

        1.E.2. Reflection and metacognition

        1.E.3. Mentor use of resources for the benefit of the mentee

1.F. Developing goals and professional portfolios

1.G. Specialized training for Alternative IV and V certification candidates and/or highly qualified teacher candidates

 

 


PROGRAM STANDARDS and INDICATORS OF PRACTICE            

 

1.A. SUPPORTS FOR BEGINNING EDUCATORS - ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORTS FOR BEGINNING EDUCATORS

 

o Initiating. There is shared understanding that beginning educators should be oriented and supported, not left to figure things out on their own.

 

o Beginning.  Beginning educators’ assignments represent a consideration of individual student need, class size, number of lesson preparations, number of preparation periods, and classroom assignments.

 

o Developing.  Beginning educators’ assignments ensure a balance of individual student need and class size, a minimum number of lesson preparations, a maximum number of preparation periods, and beginning educators have their own classroom.

 

o Establishing. Beginning educators’ assignments ensure a balance of individual student need and class size, a minimum number of lesson preparations, a maximum number of preparation periods, and beginning educators have their own classroom.  Whenever possible, further supports to maximize the beginning educator experience should be implemented.  Recommendations are:

  • Reduced teaching load
  • Smaller class size
  • Limited co-curricular assignments
  • Reduced number of duties assigned
  • Scheduled planning time with the mentor
  • Release time for observations and meetings with educators

 

1.A. SUPPORTS FOR BEGINNING EDUCATORS - ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORTS FOR BEGINNING EDUCATORS

 

 

Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Evidence

To what extent do beginning educators’ assignments ensure …

  • a balance of individual student need and class size?
  • a minimum number of lesson preparations and a maximum number of preparation periods?
  • beginning educators have their own classroom?

 

To what extent are the following further supports implemented to maximize the beginning educator’s experience?

  • Reduced teaching load
  • Smaller class size
  • Limited co-curricular assignments
  • Reduced number of duties assigned
  • Scheduled planning time with the mentor
  • Release time for observations and meetings with educators?

 

Action for program improvement (Organizational support for beginning educators)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

PROGRAM STANDARDS and INDICATORS OF PRACTICE            

 

1.B. SUPPORTS FOR BEGINNING EDUCATORS - ORIENTATION FOR BEGINNING EDUCATORS

 

o Beginning. Orientation is provided in:

·        who’s who in the district and what resources are available

·        community profile and resources

·        procedures and routines for getting the year started

·        curriculum standards and district curriculum overview

·        special education procedures

·        parent communication

·        professional development

·        district goals

·        supervision and evaluation

·        legal and ethical issues

·        the local teacher professional organization (union)

·        mentoring services and continuing induction program components

 

 

o Developing. Orientation is provided prior to the school year which addresses:

·        who’s who in the district and what resources are available

·        community profile and resources

·        procedures and routines for getting the year started

·        curriculum standards and district curriculum overview

·        special education procedures

·        parent communication

·        professional development

·        district goals

·        supervision and evaluation

·        legal and ethical issues

·        the local teacher professional organization (union)

·        mentoring services and continuing induction program components

Those beginning educators who receive mentoring services will receive an orientation to the induction-with-mentoring program.

 

o Establishing. Orientation is provided prior to the school year, and attendance is required.  The orientation addresses:

·        who’s who in the district and what resources are available

·        community profile and resources

·        procedures and routines for getting the year started

·        curriculum standards and district curriculum overview

·        special education procedures

·        parent communication

·        professional development

·        district goals

·        supervision and evaluation

·        legal and ethical issues

·        the local teacher professional organization (union)

·        mentoring services and continuing induction program components

 


 

1.B. SUPPORTS FOR BEGINNING EDUCATORS – ORIENTATION FOR BEGINNING EDUCATORS

 

 

Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Evidence

To what extent is orientation provided prior to the school year and attendance required?

 

To what extent does the orientation address the following:

¨        Who’s who in the district and what resources are available

¨        Community profile and resources

¨        Procedures and routines for getting the year started

¨        Curriculum standards and district curriculum overview

¨        Special education procedures

¨        Parent communication

¨        Professional development

¨        District goals

¨        Supervision and evaluation

¨        Legal and ethical issues

¨        The local teacher professional organization (union)

¨        Mentoring services and continuing induction program components

 

To what extent do beginning educators who receive mentoring services receive an orientation to the induction-with-mentoring program?

 

To what extent is the orientation to the induction-with-mentoring program the beginning of a multi-year induction program?

 

 

 

 

 

Action for program improvement (Orientation for beginning educators)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PROGRAM STANDARDS and INDICATORS OF PRACTICE            

 

1.C. SUPPORTS FOR BEGINNING EDUCATORS – ONGOING INDUCTION FOR BEGINNING EDUCATORS

 

o Beginning. In addition to orientation, induction consists of informal, periodic meetings offered for beginning educators in which experiences, challenges and successes are shared. 

 

Additional topics that might be addressed are:

 

v     required content knowledge

  • curriculum and standards for students
  • content standards for teachers
  • current school and district initiatives

 

v     the district’s  beliefs and vision for student learning and success, as evidenced in:

  • classroom management
  • behavior management
  • general and content specific instructional best practices
  • planning and preparation
  • assessment techniques
  • special education modifications

 

v     support processes and procedures, such as:

  • parent conferences
  • report cards, progress reports
  • district record keeping systems and software programs
  • formal assessments
  • special education structures and procedures

 

v     professional responsibilities

  • participating in school initiatives and on school committees
  • interacting with parents and the community
  • fulfilling record keeping and documentation requirements
  • reflecting and growing professionally in terms of knowledge and skills
  • demonstrating professionalism toward students, parents, and peers

 

o Developing. There is an induction curriculum with support materials.  This curriculum is presented during required scheduled meetings (or other learning formats) throughout the school year.  This induction curriculum is aligned with the professional educator competencies outlined in Ed 610 and the district’s instructional program and goals.  An opportunity to share experiences, challenges and successes is an integral part of these sessions. Induction curriculum topics addressed are:

 

v     required content knowledge

  • curriculum and standards for students
  • content standards for teachers
  • current school and district initiative

 

v     the district’s  beliefs and vision for student learning and success, as evidenced in:

  • classroom management
  • behavior management
  • general and content specific instructional best practices
  • planning and preparation
  • assessment techniques
  • special education modifications

 

v     support processes and procedures, such as:

  • parent conferences
  • report cards, progress reports
  • district record keeping systems and software programs
  • formal assessments
  • special education structures and procedures

 

v     professional responsibilities

  • participating in school initiatives and on school committees
  • interacting with parents and the community
  • fulfilling record keeping and documentation requirements
  • reflecting and growing professionally in terms of knowledge and skills
  • demonstrating professionalism toward students, parents, and peers

 

o Establishing. There is a written induction curriculum with support materials.  This curriculum is presented during required scheduled meetings (or other learning formats) throughout the first three years of a beginning educator’s career. This induction curriculum reflects the professional educator competencies outlined in Ed 610 and the district’s instructional program and goals.  An opportunity to share experiences, challenges and successes is an integral part of these sessions.  Induction curriculum topics addressed are:

 

v     required content knowledge

  • curriculum and standards for students
  • content standards for teachers
  • current school and district initiatives

 

v     the district’s  beliefs and vision for student learning and success, as evidenced in:

  • classroom management
  • behavior management
  • general and content specific instructional best practices
  • planning and preparation
  • assessment techniques
  • special education modifications

 

v     support processes and procedures, such as:

  • parent conferences
  • report cards, progress reports
  • district record keeping systems and software programs
  • formal assessments
  • special education structures and procedures

 

v     professional responsibilities

  • participating in school initiatives and on school committees
  • interacting with parents and the community
  • fulfilling record keeping and documentation requirements
  • reflecting and growing professionally in terms of knowledge and skills
  • demonstrating professionalism toward students, parents, and peers

 

 


 

1.C. SUPPORTS FOR BEGINNING EDUCATORS – ONGOING INDUCTION FOR BEGINNING EDUCATORS

 

 

Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Evidence

To what extent is there a written induction curriculum with support materials?

 

To what extent is the induction curriculum presented during required scheduled meetings (or other learning formats) throughout the first three years of a beginning educator’s career?

 

To what extent does the induction curriculum reflect the professional educator competencies outlined in NH Administrative Rule ED610 or 505.07 and the district’s instructional program and goals?

 

To what extent is the opportunity to share experiences, challenges, and successes an integral part of these sessions?

 

To what extent are the following induction curriculum topics addressed:

 

Required content knowledge:

¨     Curriculum and standards for students

¨     Content standards for teachers

¨     Current school and district initiatives

 

The district’s beliefs and vision for student learning and success, as evidenced in:

¨     Classroom management

¨     Behavior management

¨     General and content specific instructional best practices

¨     Planning and preparation

¨     Assessment techniques

¨     Special education modifications

 

Support processes and procedures, such as:

¨     Parent conferences

¨     Report cards, progress reports

¨     District record keeping systems and software programs

¨     Formal assessments

¨     Special education structures and procedures

 

Professional responsibilities:

¨     Participating in school initiatives and on school committees

¨     Interacting with parents and the community

¨     Fulfilling record keeping and documentation requirements

¨     Reflecting and growing professionally in terms of knowledge and skills

¨     Demonstrating professionalism toward students, parents, and peers

 

Action for program improvement (Ongoing induction for beginning educators)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PROGRAM STANDARDS and INDICATORS OF PRACTICE            

 

1.D. SUPPORTS FOR BEGINNING EDUCATORS – MENTOR/MENTEE FOCUS

 

 

o Beginning. Guided by the daily experiences of the beginning educator, the mentor works with the mentee to develop the skills and knowledge needed to be a successful educator. Short-term objectives and/or focus areas for each mentee are a continuous conversation between the mentor and mentee.  The mentor uses various materials to support the work.  The mentor is a prime personal support to the mentee as he/she navigates the journey of becoming an experienced professional educator. 

 

o Developing. The mentor works with the mentee in a systematic manner to implement and reinforce the district induction curriculum according to the strengths and needs of the mentee. Short-term objectives and/or focus areas for each mentee are a continuous conversation between the mentor and mentee.  The mentor is a prime personal support to the mentee as he/she navigates the journey of becoming an experienced professional educator. 

 

o Establishing. The mentor works with the mentee in a systematic manner to implement and reinforce the district induction curriculum according to the strengths and needs of the mentee. Short-term objectives and/or focus areas for each mentee are a continuous conversation between the mentor and mentee.  The mentor is a prime personal support to the mentee as he/she navigates the journey of becoming an experienced professional educator.  The relationship continues over the three years while the mentee develops a broader support system and becomes more self-sufficient.


 

1.D. SUPPORTS FOR BEGINNING EDUCATORS – MENTOR/MENTEE FOCUS

 

 

Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Evidence

To what extent does the mentor work with the mentee in a systematic manner to implement and reinforce the district induction curriculum according to the strengths and needs of the mentee?

 

To what extent are short-term objectives and/or focus areas for each mentee a continuous conversation between the mentor and mentee?

 

To what extent is the mentor a prime personal support to the mentee as he/she navigates the journey of becoming an experienced professional educator? 

 

To what extent does the relationship between the mentor and mentee continue over three years while the mentee develops a broader support system and becomes more self-sufficient?

 

 

Action for program improvement (Mentor/mentee focus)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PROGRAM STANDARDS and INDICATORS OF PRACTICE            

 

1.E. SUPPORTS FOR BEGINNING EDUCATORS – MENTOR/MENTEE STRATEGIES

1.E.1.  ONGOING OBSERVATION AND MODELING

 

 

o Beginning. There are informal classroom observations by the mentor with timely, constructive feedback to the mentee.

 

 

o Developing. There are planned, on-going observations by the mentor.  Usually each observation is combined with a planning conference in which the mentee and mentor discuss the purposes and context of the observation, and then a reflecting conference in which the observation data, learnings, and next steps are discussed.   The mentee also observes in the mentor’s or some other teacher’s classroom and discusses with the mentor what he/she observed.

 

 

o Establishing. During the three year induction period, there are planned, on-going observations by the mentor.  Each observation is combined with a planning conference in which the mentee and mentor discuss the purposes and context of the observation, and then a reflecting conference in which the observation data, learnings, and next steps are discussed. The mentee also observes in the mentor’s or some other teacher’s classroom and discusses with the mentor what he/she observed. The mentor may model or co-teach lessons in the mentor’s or mentee’s classroom.  Both parties learn and grow from these experiences and reflect on their observations.


 

1.E.1. SUPPORTS FOR BEGINNING EDUCATORS – MENTOR/MENTEE STRATEGIES – ONGOING OBSERVATION AND MODELING

 

 

Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Evidence

To what extent are there planned, on-going observations by the mentor during the three-year induction period?

 

To what extent is each observation combined with a planning conference in which the mentee and mentor discuss the purposes and context of the observation, and then a reflecting conference in which the observation data, learnings, and next steps are discussed?

 

To what extent does the mentee observe the mentor’s or some other teacher’s classroom and discuss with the mentor what he/she observed?

 

To what extent does the mentor model or co-teach lessons in the mentor’s or mentee’s classroom?

 

To what extent do both parties learn and grow from these experiences and reflect on their observations?

 

 

Action for program improvement (Ongoing observation and modeling)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PROGRAM STANDARDS and INDICATORS OF PRACTICE            

 

1.E. SUPPORTS FOR BEGINNING EDUCATORS – MENTOR/MENTEE STRATEGIES

1.E.2.  REFLECTION AND METACOGNITION

 

o Beginning. Reflection and metacognition are encouraged, but there is no formal coaching.  The emphasis is on good instructional practice.

 

o Developing. The mentor coaches the mentee to engage in reflective, metacognitive practices about good instructional practice.

 

o Establishing. The mentor and mentee regularly reflect on their teaching practices.  Mentors in the program use their skills to promote the mutual exploration of deeper levels of understanding by facilitating the examination of underlying assumptions about teaching and learning, and connections among teacher choices, student performance, and educational context.

 


 

1.E.2. SUPPORTS FOR BEGINNING EDUCATORS – MENTOR/MENTEE STRATEGIES – REFLECTION AND METACOGNITION

 

 

Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Evidence

To what extent do the mentor and mentee regularly reflect on their teaching practices?

 

To what extent do mentors in the program use their skills to promote the mutual exploration of deeper levels of understanding by facilitating the examination of underlying assumptions about teaching and learning, and connections among teacher choices, student performance and educational context?

 

 

Action for program improvement (Reflection and metacognition)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PROGRAM STANDARDS and INDICATORS OF PRACTICE            

 

1.E. SUPPORTS FOR BEGINNING EDUCATORS – MENTOR/MENTEE STRATEGIES

1.E.3.  MENTOR USE OF RESOURCES FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE MENTEE

 

 

o Beginning. The mentor provides the majority of support services for the mentee, but makes some connections with other relevant resources as needs arise.

 

 

o Developing. The mentor links the mentee with other educators in the building or school district who can provide professional, instructional, and/or personal supports.

 

o Establishing. The mentor purposely connects the mentee to a wide variety (school, community, state, and beyond) of resources that will provide professional, instructional, and/or personal supports.

 


 

1.E.3. SUPPORTS FOR BEGINNING EDUCATORS – MENTOR/MENTEE STRATEGIES – MENTOR USE OF RESOURCES FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE MENTEE

 

 

Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Evidence

To what extent does the mentor purposely connect the mentee to a wide variety (school, community, state, and beyond) of resources that will provide professional, instructional, and/or personal supports?

 

 

 

 

 

Action for program improvement (Mentor use of resources for the benefit of the mentee)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PROGRAM STANDARDS and INDICATORS OF PRACTICE            

 

1.F. SUPPORTS FOR BEGINNING EDUCATORS – DEVELOPING GOALS AND DOCUMENTATION OF PROFESSIONAL GROWTH

 

 

o Beginning. The mentor is knowledgeable about the district’s professional development processes and how induction-with-mentoring is a part of the professional development program.  The mentor assists the beginning educator in identifying professional development goals and strategies consistent with the procedures of the district.

 

o Developing. The mentor is knowledgeable about the district’s professional development processes and how induction-with-mentoring is a part of the professional development program.   The mentor assists the beginning educator in identifying professional development goals, strategies and evidence to demonstrate growth and/or goal attainment based on the induction curriculum.

 

o Establishing. The mentor is knowledgeable about the district’s professional development processes and how induction-with-mentoring is a part of the professional development program.  The mentor assists the beginning educator in identifying professional development goals, strategies and evidence to demonstrate growth and/or goal attainment based on the induction curriculum. Additionally, the mentor will assist the mentee to organize documentation that demonstrates growth and/or goal attainment.

 

 


 

1.F. SUPPORTS FOR BEGINNING EDUCATORS – DEVELOPING GOALS AND DOCUMENTATION OF PROFESSIONAL GROWTH

 

 

Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Evidence

To what extent is the mentor knowledgeable about the district’s professional development processes and how induction-with-mentoring is a part of the professional development program?

 

To what extent does the mentor assist the mentee in identifying professional development goals, strategies and evidence to demonstrate growth and/or goal attainment based on the induction curriculum?

 

To what extent does the mentor assist the mentee to organize documentation that demonstrates growth and/or goal attainment?

 

 

Action for program improvement (Developing goals and documentation of professional growth)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PROGRAM STANDARDS and INDICATORS OF PRACTICE            

 

1.G. SUPPORTS FOR BEGINNING EDUCATORS – SPECIALIZED TRAINING FOR ALTERNATIVE IV AND V CERTIFICATION CANDIDATES

 

Mentors assigned to alternative IV and V certification candidates need to be:

 

  • Informed about the specific procedures for gaining certifications;
  • Prepared to help develop the alternative certification plan;
  • Certified in the content area in which the candidate is seeking certification; and
  • Knowledgeable of the curriculum frameworks and content standards.

 

 

o Beginning. Alternative IV and V certification candidates differ from beginning educators who come from a teacher-training program. They typically have not had pedagogical training, instructional and/or classroom experience.  Therefore, orientation and induction curriculum training needs may differ dramatically.  Alternative certification candidates may be included in the orientation and induction curriculum training for beginning educators, and there is additional training designed to meet their specific needs.

 

o Developing. Alternative IV and V certification candidates differ from beginning educators who come from a teacher-training program. They typically have not had pedagogical training, instructional and/or classroom experience.  Therefore orientation and induction curriculum training needs may differ dramatically.  Alternative certification candidates participate in orientation and induction curriculum training as appropriate.  Aspects of this training are modified to meet the needs of candidates.  Additional training is identified and developed to meet their specific needs.

 

o Establishing. Alternative IV and V certification candidates differ from beginning educators who come from a teacher-training program. They typically have not had pedagogical training, instructional and/or classroom experience.  Therefore orientation and induction curriculum training needs may differ dramatically.  The needs of each alternative certification candidate are not assumed, but are assessed.  Training is developed to meet their specific needs including the topics identified for beginning educators’ orientation and induction curriculum (see 7b and 7c).

 

 

 


 

1.G. SUPPORTS FOR BEGINNING EDUCATORS – SPECIALIZED TRAINING FOR ALTERNATIVE IV AND V CERTIFICATION CANDIDATES

 

 

Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Evidence

To what extent does the orientation and induction curriculum for mentees who are Alternative IV & V certification candidates differ from the induction curriculum of mentees who were Alternative I or II candidates?

 

To what extent are the training needs of mentees who are Alternative IV or V candidates met?

 

To what extent are the needs of each mentee who is an Alternative IV or V certification candidate assessed and not just assumed?

 

To what extent is training developed to meet the specific needs of mentees who are Alternative IV or V certification candidates, including the topics identified for beginning educators’ orientation and induction curriculum (se 7b & 7c)?

 

To what extent do mentors who are assigned to Alternative IV or V certification candidates meet the following criteria:

 

¨     Informed about the specific procedures for gaining certification

¨     Prepared to help develop the alternative certification plan

¨     Certified in the content area in which the candidate is seeking certification

¨     Knowledgeable of the student curriculum frameworks and teacher content standards

 

 

 

 

 

Action for program improvement (Specialized training for Alternative IV and V and/or Highly Qualified Teacher Candidates)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PROGRAM STANDARDS AND INDICATORS OF PRACTICE

 

2.  SUPPORTS FOR MENTORS

 

2.A. Orientation for Mentors

2.B. Regularly scheduled mentor support meetings

2.C. Training topics for mentors

2.D. Compensation for mentoring

2.E. Scheduling supports to perform mentoring responsibilities

2.F. Recognition and celebration

 

 


PROGRAM STANDARDS and INDICATORS OF PRACTICE            

 

2.A. SUPPORTS FOR MENTORS – ORIENTATION FOR MENTORS

 

Suggested topics:

·        schedules

·        the program evaluation process,

·        compensation,

·        mentor evaluation

·        grievance process for mentees and mentors

·        mentor selection process,

·        mentor-mentee matching process

·        confidentiality

·        expectations

·        principal’s (building administrators’) role,

·        mentor “need to knows” about the system,

·        available resources,

·        where to go for answers

·        philosophy of the mentor and induction services.

 

 

o Beginning. District-wide orientation defines the mentor roles and responsibilities and provides an overview of the induction-with-mentoring program:

·        goals and  components

·        expectations

·        processes and procedure

·        resources

·        program evaluation.

 

o Developing. A district-wide summer orientation meeting is held to define the mentor roles and responsibilities and provides an understanding* of the induction-with-mentoring program:

·        goals and  components

·        expectations

·        processes and procedures

·        resources

·        program evaluation.

 

Orientation is followed by one or more days of mentor skill training. See 6c for Mentor training topics.

 

o Establishing. A district-wide summer orientation meeting is held to define the mentor roles and responsibilities and provide an understanding* of the induction-with-mentoring program:

·        goals and  components

·        expectations

·        processes and procedures

·        resources

·        program evaluation.

 

Orientation is followed by one or more days of mentor skill training. See 6c for Mentor training topics.

 

In addition, mid-year and end-of-year meetings are held to reflect on progress, identify areas of program improvement, suggest or make commensurate adjustments in the program, and celebrate success.

 

*”Understanding” meaning research-based evidence of the rationale and benefits of mentoring as professional growth for both mentor and mentee toward improved instructional practice and student achievement.

 


 

2.A. SUPPORTS FOR MENTORS – ORIENTATION FOR MENTORS

 

 

Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Evidence

To what extent is there a district-wide orientation for mentors that also takes place in the summer?

 

To what extent does the orientation define the mentor roles and responsibilities?

 

To what extent does the orientation provide an overview and understanding of the induction-with-mentoring program, including its goals & components, expectations, processes & procedures, resources & program evaluation?

 

To what extent does the orientation provide research-based evidence of the rationale and benefits of mentoring as professional growth for both mentor and mentee toward improved instructional practice and student achievement?

 

To what extent is the orientation followed by one or more days of mentor skill training?

 

To what extent are there meetings in the middle and end of the school year to reflect on the program progress, identify areas of program improvement, and suggest or make commensurate adjustments in the program, and celebrate success?

 

 

Action for program improvement (Orientation for mentors)

 

 

 

 

 


 

PROGRAM STANDARDS and INDICATORS OF PRACTICE            

 

2.B. SUPPORTS FOR MENTORS – REGULARLY SCHEDULED MENTOR SUPPORT MEETINGS

 

 

o Beginning. Mentors meet with other mentors in their building or district as problems arise.

 

o Developing. Mentors meet periodically with other mentors in their building or district, during the school year, to:

¨     reflect on progress

¨     share experiences

¨     problem solve

¨     provide support for one another

 

o Establishing. Mentors meet on a regularly scheduled basis, during the school year, with other mentors  in their building or district, to:

¨     reflect on progress

¨     share experiences

¨     problem solve

¨     provide support for one another

 

In addition, agenda items focused on skill and/or program improvement are included.

 


 

2.B. SUPPORTS FOR MENTORS – REGULARLY SCHEDULED MENTOR SUPPORT MEETINGS

 

 

Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Evidence

To what extent do mentors meet on a regularly scheduled basis, during the school year, and with other mentors in their building or district?

 

When mentors meet during the school year, to what extent do they perform the following:

¨     Reflect on progress

¨     Share experiences

¨     Problem solve

¨     Provide support for one another

¨     Work on skill improvement

¨     Work on program improvement

 

 

 

Action for program improvement (Regularly scheduled mentor support meetings)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PROGRAM STANDARDS and INDICATORS OF PRACTICE            

 

2.C. SUPPORTS FOR MENTORS – TRAINING TOPICS FOR MENTORS

 

In addition to the listed topics, mentors of alternative IV and V certification candidates need to be:

·        Informed about the specific procedures for gaining certification

·        prepared to help develop the alternative certification plan

·        certified in the content area in which the candidate is seeking certification, and

·        knowledgeable of the content frameworks and standards in the content area. 

 

o Initiating. There is understanding for, and financial and programmatic support for, the initial and on-going training of mentors.  There is understanding that there are discreet skills that effective mentors use to help the thinking and practice of new teachers.  Without on-going skill training, orientation to responsibilities and expectations, and some accountability measures, there is no program, only a group of well meaning people doing their best to help new staff.

 

o Beginning. Training is given in:

 

¨     needs of beginning educators

¨     qualities of effective mentors

¨     stages of teacher development

¨     sensitivity to learning styles and differences among learners

¨     listening and questioning techniques

¨     developing good rapport

¨     modeling and coaching effective classroom management

¨     modeling and coaching effective instructional strategies

¨     classroom observation

¨     giving effective feedback

¨     professional rights and responsibilities

¨     district policies and procedures

¨     resources (human and material) for beginning educators

¨     diversity issues and implications

 

 

o Developing. In addition to the beginning level topics, mentor capacity is deepened with skill development in:

 

¨     stages of adult development

¨     cognitive coaching

¨     paraphrasing,

¨     content coaching

¨     school district philosophy and priorities

¨     data gathering

¨     conferring techniques

¨     collaborating with and involving other educators in the beginning educator’s learning experiences

 

 

o Establishing. In addition to the beginning and developing level topics, training in these areas is given:

 

¨     metacognition (thinking about your thinking)

¨     fostering self-esteem and self-reliance

¨     creating school-wide systems of support for beginning educators.

 

 


 

2.C. SUPPORTS FOR MENTORS – TRAINING TOPICS FOR MENTORS

 

 

Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Evidence

To what extent is training provided to mentors in the following topics:

¨     needs of beginning educators

¨     qualities of effective mentors

¨     stages of teacher development

¨     sensitivity to learning styles and differences among learners

¨     listening and questioning techniques

¨     developing good rapport

¨     modeling and coaching effective classroom management

¨     modeling and coaching effective instructional strategies

¨     classroom observation

¨     giving effective feedback

¨     professional rights and responsibilities

¨     district policies and procedures

¨     resources (human and material) for beginning educators

¨     diversity issues and implications

¨     metacognition (thinking about your thinking)

¨     fostering self-esteem and self-reliance

¨     creating school-wide systems of support for beginning educators

 

To what extent is mentor skill development deepened in the following areas:

¨     stages of adult development

¨     cognitive coaching

¨     paraphrasing,

¨     content coaching

¨     school district philosophy and priorities

¨     data gathering

¨     conferring techniques

¨     collaborating with and involving other educators in the beginning educator’s learning experiences

 

To what extent are mentors of Alternative IV or V candidates provided training in:

¨     Specific procedures for gaining certification

¨     Developing an alternative certification plan

¨     Student curriculum frameworks

¨     Teacher certification standards, including pedagogy & content

 

 

Action for program improvement (Training topics for mentors)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PROGRAM STANDARDS and INDICATORS OF PRACTICE            

 

2.D. SUPPORTS FOR MENTORS – COMPENSATION FOR MENTORING

 

 

o Beginning. Compensation for mentors is primarily professional development credit, or release from other assigned duties, or, the mentor position is a paid part-time or full-time position.

 

o Developing. Compensation for mentors is a combination of the following:

¨     stipend

¨     professional development credit/compensation

¨     reduced duties

¨     reduced teaching load

 

or the mentor position is a paid part-time or full-time position.

 

o Establishing. Compensation for mentors includes a reduced teaching load according to the number of beginning educators assigned to the mentor.  Additional compensation may be given, such as

¨     stipend

¨     professional development credit/compensation

¨     reduced duties

 

or the mentor position is a paid part-time or full-time position.


 

2.D. SUPPORTS FOR MENTORS – COMPENSATION FOR MENTORING

 

 

Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Evidence

Are mentors compensated for their work?

 

To what extent is mentor compensation in accordance with the number of mentees assigned?

 

To what extent does mentor compensation include the following?

¨     Stipend

¨     Professional development credit

¨     Release from or reduced assigned duties

¨     Reduced teaching load

¨     Salaried as full-time or part-time mentor

 

 

Action for program improvement (Compensation for mentoring)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PROGRAM STANDARDS and INDICATORS OF PRACTICE            

 

2.E. SUPPORTS FOR MENTORS – SCHEDULING SUPPORTS TO PERFORM MENTORING

 

 

o Beginning. There is some release time for mentors to perform their mentor responsibilities including collaboration time with the mentee.

 

o Developing. Release time during the day for mentor/mentee collaboration is recognized as necessary, and is built into the mentor’s schedule.

 

o Establishing. Release time during the day for mentor/mentee collaboration is recognized as necessary for support and is built into the mentor’s schedule. Time to meet with other mentors and program staff is an established part of the program.


 

2.E. SUPPORTS FOR MENTORS – SCHEDULING SUPPORTS TO PERFORM MENTORING

 

 

Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Evidence

To what extent is release time during the school day for mentor/mentee collaboration recognized as necessary for support and built into the mentor’s schedule?

 

To what extent is time to meet with other mentors and program staff an established part of the program?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Action for program improvement (Scheduling supports to perform mentoring)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PROGRAM STANDARDS and INDICATORS OF PRACTICE            

 

2.F. SUPPORTS FOR MENTORS – RECOGNITION AND CELEBRATION

 

 

o Beginning. There is school-level recognition of the induction-with-mentoring program and success of the program is celebrated in faculty gatherings.

 

 

o Developing. There is school and district-level recognition of the induction-with-mentoring program, and success of the program is celebrated.

 

 

o Establishing. There is public (school, district, and community) recognition and celebration of the induction-with-mentoring program and successes are described in district level reports, newsletters, community newspapers, etc.

 

 


 

2.F. SUPPORTS FOR MENTORS – RECOGNITION AND CELEBRATION

 

 

Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Evidence

To what extent is there public (including school, district, and community) recognition and celebration of the induction-with-mentoring program?

 

To what extent are induction-with-mentoring program successes described in district level reports, newsletters, community newspapers, etc?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Action for program improvement (Recognition and celebration)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PROGRAM STANDARDS AND INDICATORS OF PRACTICE

 

3.  ROLE AND SUPPORTS FOR ADMINISTRATORS

 

3.A.  Program Monitoring

 

3.B.  Administrator Training

 

3.C.  Collaboration Around Administering the Program

 

 

 


PROGRAM STANDARDS and INDICATORS OF PRACTICE            

 

3.A. PROGRAM MONITORING

 

 

o Initiating. Ultimately no program will succeed without authority and strong support from building and/or district administrators.  However, it can be the case that a program may start with administrator sanction and support, but without much involvement.  Over time building/district administrators must learn and practice their own roles in making induction and mentoring services a success.

 

o Beginning. A program administrator meets with mentors and other induction-with-mentoring program staff as issues about program implementation arise.

 

o Developing. A program administrator meets periodically with mentors and other induction-with-mentoring program staff for the purpose of monitoring program implementation and formatively assessing the degree to which program goals are being met based on data collected.

 

 

o Establishing. A program administrator holds regularly scheduled meetings with mentors and other induction-with-mentoring program staff for the purpose of monitoring program implementation and formatively assessing the degree to which program goals are being met based on data collected.  The assessment results are shared with stakeholders and used to make program improvement changes.

 

 

 


 

3.A. PROGRAM MONITORING

 

 

Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Evidence

To what extent does a program administrator hold regularly scheduled meetings with mentors and other induction-with-mentoring program staff for the purpose of monitoring the program implementation and formatively assessing the degree to which program goals are being met based on data collected?

 

To what extent are assessment results shared with stakeholders and used to make program improvement changes?

 

 

 

 

 

Action for program improvement (Program monitoring)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

PROGRAM STANDARDS and INDICATORS OF PRACTICE            

 

3.B. ROLES AND SUPPORTS FOR ADMINISTRATORS – ADMINISTRATOR TRAINING       

 

 

o Beginning. Building administrators receive training in various aspects of an induction-with-mentoring program, including:

¨     philosophy

¨     basic concepts

¨     requirements

¨     benefits

¨     implementation

¨     roles and responsibilities of an administrator in supporting mentors, mentees, and other staff

¨     the role a mentor can play in supporting alternative  certification candidates

 

o Developing. Building administrators receive on-going and in-depth training in the various aspects of an induction-with-mentoring program, including:

¨     philosophy

¨     basic concepts

¨     requirements

¨     benefits

¨     implementation

¨     roles and responsibilities of an administrator in supporting mentors, mentees, and other staff

¨     the role a mentor can play in supporting alternative  certification candidates

¨     typical issues confronting the administrator

 

Building administrators take an active role in supporting the program.

 

o Establishing. Building administrators receive on-going and in-depth training in the various aspects of an induction-with-mentoring program, including:

¨     philosophy

¨     basic concepts

¨     requirements

¨     benefits

¨     implementation

¨     roles and responsibilities of an administrator in supporting mentors mentees, and other staff

¨     the role a mentor can play in supporting alternative  certification candidates

¨     typical issues confronting the administrator

 

Building administrators take an active role in supporting and promoting the program.

 

 


 

3.B. ROLES AND SUPPORTS FOR ADMINISTRATORS – ADMINISTRATOR TRAINING

 

Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Evidence

To what extent do all administrators receive on-going and in-depth training in the various aspects of the induction-with-mentoring program, including

¨     Philosophy

¨     Basic concepts

¨     Requirements

¨     Benefits

¨     Implementation

¨     Roles & responsibilities of the building and the program administrator in supporting mentors, mentees, and other staff

¨     Role a mentor can play in supporting alternative certification candidates

¨     Typical issues confronting the building administrator

 

To what extent do all administrators take an active role in supporting and promoting the induction-with-mentoring program?

 

 

 

 

Action for program improvement (Administrator training)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PROGRAM STANDARDS and INDICATORS OF PRACTICE            

 

3.C. ROLE AND SUPPORTS FOR ADMINISTRATORS – COLLABORATION AROUND ADMINISTERING THE PROGRAM

 

 

o Beginning. The program administrator confers with colleagues on an occasional and informal basis when issues related to administering the induction-with-mentoring program arise.

 

o Developing. There is a network of individuals whom the program administrator accesses to discuss and reflect upon data gathered, issues, problems, successes, and learnings related to administering the induction-with-mentoring program.

 

o Establishing. There is an established network of individuals with whom the program administrator can confidentially discuss data gathered, issues, problems, successes, and learnings related to administering the induction-with-mentoring program.  There is also a mechanism within the district to share solutions and learnings with other administrators in a way that respects individual confidentiality.

 

 

 


 

3.C. ROLE AND SUPPORTS FOR ADMINISTRATORS – COLLABORATION AROUND ADMINISTERING THE PROGRAM

 

 

Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Evidence

To what extent is there an established network of individuals with whom the program administrator can confidentially discuss data gathered, issues, problems, successes, and learnings related to administering the induction-with-mentoring program?

 

To what extent is there a mechanism within the district to share solutions and learnings with all other administrators in a way that respects individual confidentiality?

 

 

 

 

Action for program improvement (Collaboration around administering the program)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PROGRAM STANDARDS AND INDICATORS OF PRACTICE

 

4.  PROGRAM SUPPORT

 

4.A.  Leadership, Authority, Vision and Desired Outcomes

4.B.  Documentation – District Policies and Procedures Manual and Induction-with-Mentoring Program Handbook

4.C.  Criteria and process for selecting mentors

4.D.  Criteria and process for matching mentor and mentee

4.E.  Time for mentor/mentee to meet

4.F.  Supportive atmosphere

4.G.  Collaborative culture/learning community

4.H.  Contact lists and community resources

4.I.  Stress and wellness issues

4.J.  Grievance process

4.K.  Integrated support system of time, money, policies and procedures

 


4.A. PROGRAM SUPPORT – LEADERSHIP, AUTHORITY, VISION AND DESIRED OUTCOMES

 

o Initiating. Any new program, service or practice needs a champion, empowered with authority, to envision what things will look like, how implementation will happen, and what benefits will be realized.  The champion may be a person, or group of people, from the “top” or grass roots of the organization.  This is the person or persons who inspire things to happen.

 

o Beginning. One person, or a few people, with energy and commitment design and deliver induction-with-mentoring services with the sanction of building and/or district administration.  The vision of the program of services is generally understood and accepted; the desired outcomes are vague.

 

o Developing. One person, or a team of people, is given authority by the building and/or district administration to establish and operate induction-with-mentoring services.  The vision and desired outcomes of the services are generated through discussion and are clearly articulated, broadly understood, and supported.  Building and/or district Administrators participate in the design process and are clear about their roles in implementing services.

 

o Establishing. Building and/or district Administrators and mentor leaders work together to implement, monitor, evaluate, and redesign as necessary, the induction-with-mentoring services according to the vision and desired outcomes established, which are clearly articulated, broadly understood, and supported.  Building and/or district Administrators participate in the design process and are clear about their roles in implementing services.

 


4.A. PROGRAM SUPPORT – LEADERSHIP, AUTHORITY, VISION AND DESIRED OUTCOMES

 

 

Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Evidence

To what extent do building and/or district Administrators and mentor leaders work together to implement, monitor, evaluate, and redesign as necessary, the induction-with-mentoring services according to the vision and desired outcomes established, which are clearly articulated, broadly understood, and supported?

 

To what extent do building and/or district Administrators participate in the design process and are clear about their roles in implementing services?

 

 

 

 

Action for program improvement (Documentation)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

4.B. PROGRAM SUPPORT – DOCUMENTATION – DISTRICT POLICIES AND PROCEDURES HANDBOOK AND INDUCTION-WITH-MENTORING HANDBOOK

 

o Beginning. Induction-with-mentoring program guidelines are conveyed informally to participants at orientation sessions.

 

o Developing. Induction-with-mentoring program guidelines are formalized and written in an Induction-with-Mentoring Program Handbook(s) for mentees and mentors.  Included are:

¨     components

¨     services

¨     participants

¨     expectations

¨     roles

¨     responsibilities

¨     supports

¨     How the Induction-with-Mentoring Program relates to other programs such as supervision and evaluation, professional development, etc.

 

o Establishing. Induction-with-mentoring program guidelines are formalized and written in an Induction-with-Mentoring Program Handbook for mentees and mentors.  The Induction-with-Mentoring Program is also referenced in the district program policy and procedures manual.  Included are:

¨     components

¨     services

¨     participants

¨     expectations

¨     roles

¨     responsibilities

¨     supports

¨     How the Induction-with-Mentoring Program relates to other programs such as supervision and evaluation, professional development, etc.

¨     intended program results

¨     program evaluation procedures.

 


 

4.B. PROGRAM SUPPORT – DOCUMENTATION – DISTRICT POLICIES AND PROCEDURES HANDBOOK AND INDUCTION-WITH-MENTORING HANDBOOK

 

 

Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Evidence

To what extent are induction-with-mentoring program guidelines formalized and written in an Induction-with-Mentoring Program Handbook(s) for mentees and mentors?

 

If there is a Handbook, which of the following components are included?

¨     Components of the program

¨     Services provided

¨     Participants of the program

¨     Expectations

¨     Roles

¨     Responsibilities

¨     Supports

¨     How the Induction-with-Mentoring program relates to other programs, such as supervision & evaluation, professional development, etc.

¨     Intended program results

¨     Program evaluation procedures

 

To what extent is the induction-with-mentoring program referenced in the district program policy and procedures manual?

 

 

Action for program improvement (Documentation)

 

 

 

 

 


 

PROGRAM STANDARDS and INDICATORS OF PRACTICE            

 

4.C. PROGRAM SUPPORT – CRITERIA AND PROCESS FOR SELECTING MENTORS

 

Criteria to consider:

¨     Preferably five or more years of teaching experience

¨     Knowledge of instructional best practice

¨     Knowledge of content

¨     Knowledge of district, policies, and resources

¨     A reflective practitioner who models professional growth

¨     Strong written and oral communication skills

¨     Active listener

¨     Positive attitude toward teaching and learning

¨     Flexible and open to new ideas

¨     Respected by peers

¨     Willing to share and examine one’s own teaching experience and practice

¨     Willing to commit to a caring, helping relationship

¨     Respectful of the confidentiality requirement

 

o Beginning. Written criteria exist for mentor selection.

 

o Developing. Written and measurable* criteria for mentor selection are developed by a district-wide team or committee and are applied consistently.

 

o Establishing. Written and measurable criteria for mentor selection are developed by a district-wide team or committee.  The process for selection is based on these written criteria, clearly articulated and documented, accepted by staff and administration, and are applied consistently.

 

* “measurable” in the sense that the criterion can be demonstrated and assessed in some consistent manner.  For example, a team might identify what qualities constitute being “respected by peers,” and use these as criteria for the selection process.

 


 

4.C. PROGRAM SUPPORT – CRITERIA AND PROCESS FOR SELECTING MENTORS

 

 

Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Evidence

Which of the following are part of the criteria for mentor selection?

¨     Years of teaching experience (5 or more years)

¨     Knowledge of instructional best practice

¨     Knowledge of content

¨     Knowledge of district, policies, & resources

¨     A reflective practitioner who models professional growth

¨     Strong written and oral communication skills

¨     Active listener

¨     Positive attitude toward teaching and learning

¨     Flexible and open to new ideas

¨     Respected by peers

¨     Willing to share and examine one’s own teaching experience and practice

¨     Willing to commit to a caring, helping relationship

¨     Respectful of the confidentiality requirement

 

To what extent are there written and measurable criteria for mentor selection?

To what extent were the criteria developed by a district-wide team or committee?

To what extent are the criteria clearly articulated and documented as well as accepted by staff and administration?

To what extent are the criteria applied consistently?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Action for program improvement (Criteria and process for selecting mentors)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PROGRAM STANDARDS and INDICATORS OF PRACTICE            

 

4.D. PROGRAM SUPPORT – CRITERIA AND PROCESS FOR MATCHING MENTOR AND MENTEE

 

Basic criteria:

  • same content area
  • same grade level
  • physical proximity
  • accessibility

 

Regardless of the induction model or grade level, accessibility is a necessary but not sufficient condition when considering matching mentor to mentee.

 

 

o Beginning. Written criteria exist for matching mentor and mentee.  One person makes matching decisions without much input from others. Often there are limited options for matching.

 

o Developing. Written criteria for matching mentor and mentee correspond to the program model chosen (for example, full-time mentor, or part-time mentors).  The matching process involves several individuals or a team and may vary according to grade level and school organization.

 

o Establishing. Written criteria correspond to the program model chosen (for example, full-time mentor, or part-time mentors).  The matching process involves several individuals or a team and may vary according to grade level and school organization.  The induction-with mentoring program is established and robust enough, and there are mentors enough, that other criteria such as personality and style criteria can also be included to make optimal mentor/mentee matches.

 


 

4.D. PROGRAM SUPPORT – CRITERIA AND PROCESS FOR MATCHING MENTOR AND MENTEE

 

 

Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Evidence

Which of the following criteria are used for matching a mentor to a mentee?

¨     Same content area

¨     Same grade level

¨     Physical proximity

¨     Accessibility

¨     Personality

¨     Style

 

To what extent are there written criteria that correspond to the program model chosen (for example, full-time mentor or part-time mentors)?

 

To what extent does the matching process involve several individuals or a team (which may vary according to grade level and school organization)?

 

 

Action for program improvement (Criteria and process for matching mentor and mentee)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PROGRAM STANDARDS and INDICATORS OF PRACTICE            

 

4.E. PROGRAM SUPPORT – TIME FOR MENTOR/MENTEE TO MEET

 

 

o Beginning. Mentors and mentees are expected to meet regularly and arrange their own meeting time.

 

 

o Developing. Mentors and mentees are expected to meet at least weekly, but set their own schedule for meeting. . Release time/planning time during the day for mentor/mentee collaboration is provided when possible.

 

o Establishing. Mentors and mentees are expected to meet at least weekly. Release time/planning time during the day for mentor/mentee collaboration is recognized as necessary, and is built into the mentor and mentee schedules.


 

4.E. PROGRAM SUPPORT – TIME FOR MENTOR/MENTEE TO MEET

 

 

Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Evidence

To what extent are mentors and mentees expected to meet weekly?

 

To what extent is there time provided for mentor/mentee collaboration during the day?

 

To what extent is time for mentor/mentee collaboration recognized as necessary and built into the mentor and mentee schedules?

 

 

 

 

Action for program improvement (Time for mentor/mentee to meet)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PROGRAM STANDARDS and INDICATORS OF PRACTICE            

 

4.F. PROGRAM SUPPORT – SUPPORTIVE ATMOSPHERE

 

 

o Beginning. Mentors and building administrators provide one-on-one support and encouragement to beginning educators.

 

o Developing. Mentors, building administrators, department heads, and grade level colleagues provide support and encouragement to beginning educators.  There is a balance of support and challenge where the beginning educator is encouraged to engage in problem-solving and innovative techniques.

 

o Establishing. Mentors, building administrators, and the entire school community provide support and encouragement to beginning educators.  There is a balance of support and challenge where the beginning educator is encouraged to engage in problem-solving and innovative techniques.


 

4.F. PROGRAM SUPPORT – SUPPORTIVE ATMOSPHERE

 

 

Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Evidence

To what extent does the entire school community, including mentors, building administrators, department head, and grade level colleagues provide support and encouragement to beginning educators?

To what extent is there a balance of support and challenge, where the beginning educator is encouraged to engage in problem-solving and innovative techniques?

 

 

 

 

 

Action for program improvement (Supportive atmosphere)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PROGRAM STANDARDS and INDICATORS OF PRACTICE            

 

4.G. PROGRAM SUPPORTS – COLLABORATIVE CULTURE/LEARNING COMMUNITY

 

 

o Beginning. The district values a culture of collaboration and encourages all staff to support beginning educators.

 

o Developing. The district is actively working toward an established goal to develop a culture of collaboration and is promoting the values of a professional learning community.

 

o Establishing. The district is a professional learning community in which a culture of continuous collaboration and learning exists among all educators.

 

 


 

4.G. PROGRAM SUPPORTS – COLLABORATIVE CULTURE/LEARNING COMMUNITY

 

 

Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Evidence

To what extent is the district a professional learning community in which a culture of continuous collaboration and learning exists among all educators?

 

To what extent do the following characteristics of a learning community exist in the district?

¨     Shared mission, vision, and values

¨     Collaborative teams

¨     Collective inquiry

¨     Action orientation and experimentation

¨     Focus on continuous improvement

¨     Data driven decisions that are results oriented

 

 

 

Action for program improvement (Collaborative culture/learning community)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PROGRAM STANDARDS and INDICATORS OF PRACTICE            

 

4.H. PROGRAM SUPPORT – CONTACT LISTS AND COMMUNITY RESOURCES

 

 

o Beginning. Mentors and mentees are provided a list of school resources and encouraged to use them.

 

 

o Developing. Mentors and mentees are provided a list of school, district, and community resources and FAQ’s that they are encouraged to use.  In addition, various resource people come to induction meetings to explain what they can offer and what opportunities in the community are available.

 

o Establishing. Mentors and mentees are provided a list of school, district, and community resources and FAQ’s that they are encouraged to use.  In addition, various human and print/electronic resources are used in induction meetings to enhance exposure and understanding.

 

 


 

4.H. PROGRAM SUPPORT – CONTACT LISTS AND COMMUNITY RESOURCES

 

 

Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Evidence

To what extent are mentors and mentees provided a list of school, district, and community resources and FAQs that they are encouraged to use?

To what extent are various human and material resources (such as print/electronic) in the school, district, and community used in induction meetings to enhance exposure and understanding of resources available?

 

 

 

 

 

Action for program improvement (Contact lists and community resources)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PROGRAM STANDARDS and INDICATORS OF PRACTICE            

 

4.I. PROGRAM SUPPORT – STRESS AND WELLNESS ISSUES

 

 

o Beginning. There is some acknowledgement of stress or wellness issues related to being a beginning educator or a mentor.

 

 

o Developing. The program provides some resources and strategies to address issues of stress or wellness related to being a beginning educator or mentor.

 

o Establishing. The program proactively addresses issues of stress and wellness related to being a beginning educator or mentor with interventions and resources to address them. 

 

 

 


 

4.I. PROGRAM SUPPORT – STRESS AND WELLNESS ISSUES

 

 

Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Evidence

To what extent does the induction-with-mentoring program acknowledge and proactively address issues of stress and wellness related to being a beginning educator or mentor?

To what extent does the induction-with-mentoring program provide the beginning educator or mentor with resources and strategies to address issues of stress or wellness related to being a beginning educator or mentor?

 

 

 

 

 

Action for program improvement (Developing goals and documentation of professional growth)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PROGRAM STANDARDS and INDICATORS OF PRACTICE            

 

4.J. PROGRAM SUPPORT – GRIEVANCE PROCESS

 

 

 

o Beginning. The process for requesting a mentor/mentee change is informal.

o Developing. There are structures in place to address problems of mentor/mentee match before they get to the grievance stage.  The process for requesting a mentor/mentee change is defined in writing.

 

o Establishing. There are structures in place to proactively address problems of mentor/mentee match or mentor ineffectiveness before they get to the grievance stage.  The process for requesting a mentor/mentee change, or removing an ineffective mentor are established and in writing.

 

 

 


 

4.J. PROGRAM SUPPORT – GRIEVANCE PROCESS

 

 

Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Evidence

To what extent are there structures in place to proactively address problems of mentor/mentee match or mentor ineffectiveness before the problem gets to the grievance stage? 

To what extent is there a process and one established in writing for requesting a mentor/mentee change or for removing an ineffective mentor?

 

 

 

 

 

Action for program improvement (Grievance process)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

PROGRAM STANDARDS and INDICATORS OF PRACTICE            

 

4.K. PROGRAM SUPPORT – INTEGRATED SUPPORT SYSTEM OF TIME, MONEY, POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

 

o Initiating. There is recognition that there are costs associated with conducting an induction-with-mentoring program such as incentives, training, classroom coverage, materials, meeting costs, etc.  A long- term commitment to provide resources is anticipated.

 

o Beginning. Some supports are built into budgets, schedules, job descriptions, and expectations.  Funding can come from district budget, grant money, contract agreements, etc.

o Developing. All supports are clearly articulated and built into budgets, schedules, job descriptions, and expectations.  These supports include:

¨     time to meet

¨     incentives

¨     consideration of caseload

¨     compensation.

 

Funding may come from a variety of sources and is moving toward long term, planned commitment.

 

o Establishing. Full, long-term commitment has been made to program support, including :

¨     time to meet

¨     incentives

¨     consideration of caseload

¨     compensation

 

All supports are built into budgets, schedules, job descriptions, and expectations.

 

 


 

4.K. PROGRAM SUPPORT – INTEGRATED SUPPORT SYSTEM OF TIME, MONEY, POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

 

 

Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Evidence

To what extent are all supports (including time to meet, incentives, consideration of caseload & compensation) clearly articulated and built into budgets, schedules, job descriptions and expectations so that long-term commitment to the program is made?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Action for program improvement (Integrated support system)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PROGRAM STANDARDS AND INDICATORS OF PRACTICE

 

5.  PROGRAM EVALUATION

 

5.A.  Program evaluation

 

 

 


PROGRAM STANDARDS and INDICATORS OF PRACTICE            

 

5.A. PROGRAM EVALUATION

 

 

 

o Beginning. Induction-with-mentoring program evaluation is based on a limited number of data inputs and focuses primarily on participant satisfaction.

 

o Developing. Induction-with-mentoring program evaluation is based on data that indicates the degree to which program components are implemented and program goals are met.  An end-of-year reflection meeting is held.  Its purpose is to debrief the year’s program and identify areas for improvement.

 

o Establishing. Induction-with-mentoring program evaluation examines multiple sources and types of data to evaluate progress toward program goals. (See the Guiding Questions listed in the Assessment Section of this Toolkit.)  Evaluation data is systematically and regularly gathered, and is used to make future program improvements.  Results are disseminated to stakeholders on an annual basis.

 

 


 

5.A. PROGRAM EVALUATION

 

 

Reflective Questions for Self-Assessment

 

Evidence

To what extent does the induction-with-mentoring program evaluation examine multiple sources and types of data to evaluate progress toward program goals?

 

To what extent is evaluation data systemically and regularly gathered and used to make future program improvements?

 

To what extent are evaluation results disseminated to stakeholders on an annual basis?

 

 

 

Action for program improvement (Program evaluation)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PROGRAM STANDARDS AND INDICATORS OF PRACTICE

 

6.  RELATIONSHIP TO TEACHER SUPERVISION AND EVALUATION AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

 

6.A.  Nonjudgmental confidentiality

6.B.  Relationship to teacher supervision and evaluation defined

6.C.  Relationship to professional development

 

 

 


PROGRAM STANDARDS and INDICATORS OF PRACTICE            

 

6.A. RELATIONSHIP TO TEACHER SUPERVISION AND EVALUATION AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT – NONJUDGMENTAL CONFIDENTIALITY

 

 

o Beginning. The induction-with-mentoring program supports beginning educators in a nonjudgmental, confidential way so that risk-taking is encouraged, learning is enhanced, and the “fear of evaluation” doesn’t impede growth.  However, the confidentiality agreement does not override the need to report violations of student/educator rights and/or safety.

 

o Developing. The induction-with-mentoring program supports beginning educators in a nonjudgmental, confidential way so that risk-taking is encouraged, learning is enhanced, and the “fear of evaluation” doesn’t impede growth.  However, the confidentiality agreement does not override the need to report violations of student/educator rights and/or safety.  There is discussion among building administrators, supervisors, mentors and mentees about the gray areas of what information can and should be shared.

 

o Establishing. The induction-with-mentoring program supports beginning educators in a nonjudgmental, confidential way so that risk-taking is encouraged, learning is enhanced, and the “fear of evaluation” doesn’t impede growth.  However, the confidentiality agreement does not override the need to report violations of student/educator rights and/or safety.  There is discussion among administrators, supervisors, mentors and mentees about the gray areas of what information can and should be shared.  Written guidelines and examples exist for how and what information mentors can and cannot share with building administrators, supervisors and staff about the mentee’s performance and/or experience.

 

 

 


 

6.A. RELATIONSHIP TO TEACHER SUPERVISION AND EVALUATION AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT – NONJUDGMENTAL CONFIDENTIALITY